In your wedding vows, you and your spouse promised to be there for one another until death. Unfortunately, you haven’t seen your spouse in weeks or months, and you have to balance your worry about them with pressing practical issues that arise during their absence. 

Maybe they went on an international business trip and dropped off the radar entirely in another country. Perhaps they went out for a jog or a run to the store and never came back. You’ve filed a police report and checked their phone records and debit card, but there’s no sign of them anywhere. 

Regardless of whether you suspect abandonment, an accident or foul play, you may be in a scenario where you need to seek a conservatorship, especially if there are assets or accounts in their name that you need to access. 

What is a Florida conservatorship?

A conservatorship involves the courts authorizing an individual to have access to or control over the finances and assets of another. In Florida, conservatorships typically only apply to scenarios with an absent individual. 

When someone has been absent for a protracted amount of time, those dependent on them or those who have a joint interest in their assets may be able to go to the Florida courts and request a conservatorship so that they can access and maintain assets.

Getting a conservatorship will likely involve proving that your spouse is truly gone or missing and that you need access to certain assets or have an interest in the assets involved. Discussing your circumstances with someone familiar with this niche area of law and be a good starting point for this complicated process.